Africa / Agriculture / CCAFS / Climate Change / Event / Film and video / ILRI / Interview / South Asia

Models predicting agricultural impacts of climate change: How good are they for Africa and South Asia?

Ox Cart Crossing a Flooded Plain, painting by Ivan Alvazovsky, 1897 (source: Wikipaintings).

On 21 Feb 2012, from 14:30–15:30 (Central European Time), a video seminar will explore how current climate models for agricultural impacts perform in Africa and South Asia. The research in this study was coordinated by Phil Thornton, an agricultural systems analyst with the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and a theme leader in the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security.

Tara Garnett, a collaborator in ILRI research who leads the Food Climate Research Network (FCRN) in the UK, reports the following in her 9 Feb 2012 newsletter.

‘Soon-to-be-released studies, coordinated by the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), assess the performance of climate models in representing the current and future climate of East Africa, West Africa and South Asia, with a particular emphasis on the models’ ability to assess impacts of climate change on the major crops currently grown in each region.

‘Profesor Richard Washington (University of Oxford) and Professor Mark New (University of Cape Town) will discuss recent trends, current projections, crop-climate suitability, and prospects for improved climate model information over the next 10 years, and answer questions from viewers.’

For more information, visit CCAFS videostream webpage to view the live webcast and to sign up for upcoming science seminars.

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