A better backyard chicken for Africa could help save the continent’s diminishing wildlife populations
ACGG / Africa / Animal Breeding / Animal Health / Animal Production / Asia / Breeds / Chickens / Disease Control / Ethiopia / Food Security / ILRI / India / News clipping / Nutrition / Pro-Poor Livestock / Vaccines / Wildlife / Women

A better backyard chicken for Africa could help save the continent’s diminishing wildlife populations

The idea that the humble chicken could become a savior of wildlife will seem improbable to many environmentalists. But as the human population grows at a rate that rapidly outpaces the ability of natural habitats to feed it, a better backyard chicken could be a real hope for people and wildlife alike. Continue reading

Kenya risks losing 18 animal and bird species, and the ecosystem services they provide—Research report
Article / Biodiversity / East Africa / Environment / Geodata / ILRI / Kenya / Pastoralism / Policy / Rangelands / Science paper / SLS / Wildlife

Kenya risks losing 18 animal and bird species, and the ecosystem services they provide—Research report

A group of scientists led by Dr Joseph Ogutu say Kenya risks losing 18 animal and bird species due to negligence. They include warthogs, lesser kudu, Thomson’s gazelle, eland, oryx, topi, hartebeest, impala, Grévy’s zebra, waterbuck, wildebeest, giraffe, gerenuk, Grant’s gazelle, buffalo, elephant, ostrich and Burchell’s zebra. Continue reading

The epidemiological search for Ebola’s hiding places
A4NH / Africa / AHH / Article / Emerging Diseases / Epidemiology / FSZ / ILRI / Pigs / Uganda / Wildlife / Zoonotic Diseases

The epidemiological search for Ebola’s hiding places

After the recent epidemic, Ebola disappeared. But this relief is only temporary: the virus is hiding somewhere—maybe in forest animals, maybe closer to home. Leigh Cowart joins the hunt. This article was first published by Wellcome on Mosaic and is reproduced here under a Creative Commons licence. Continue reading

Urban expansion has devastated once-rich wildlife populations in lands south of Nairobi, Kenya
Article / Biodiversity / East Africa / Environment / ILRI / Kenya / Pastoralism / Policy / Rangelands / Wildlife

Urban expansion has devastated once-rich wildlife populations in lands south of Nairobi, Kenya

The Athi-Kaputiei ecosystem covers about 2,200 square kilometres of Kenya’s Kajiado County, south of Nairobi. It is also home to Nairobi National Park—the world’s only game reserve within a major city. The ecosystem has experienced some dramatic changes since the late 19th century. The accounts of early writers paint a picture of a spectacular ecosystem teeming with diverse resident and migratory wildlife. Records describe abundant wildebeest that migrated seasonally with other wildlife species, livestock and pastoralists. In a recently published study my colleagues and I examined the impact of land fragmentation in the Athi-Kaputiei ecosystem between 1977 and 2014. Our study shows that urbanisation and development has put the ecosystem in distress. It has fragmented the landscape which has reduced the ability of animals to migrate as they used to. The result is that their numbers have plummeted. Continue reading

Out of Africa genetics: How the giraffe got its long neck (and other biological curiosities and exuberances)
Africa / Article / BecA / Genetics / ILRI / LiveGene / Wildlife

Out of Africa genetics: How the giraffe got its long neck (and other biological curiosities and exuberances)

Morris Agaba’s newest passion is the molecular genetics of the giraffe, specifically the genes responsible for the animal’s impossibly long neck and legs—and the highly adaptive cardiovascular system this animal has evolved to manage its formidable biological obstacles. Continue reading

Lions and people and livestock (‘Oh, my!’): New research shows they can coexist within community conservancies
Article / Biodiversity / East Africa / Environment / Kenya / Pastoralism / Policy / Rangelands / Wildlife

Lions and people and livestock (‘Oh, my!’): New research shows they can coexist within community conservancies

Humans and lions can coexist through the creation of community conservancies—privately protected areas that engage local people in conservation and ecotourism. These conservancies can help stem the unrelenting loss of lions, whose population has been in decline across Africa, and pose a viable solution to an old problem. Continue reading