Kenya risks losing 18 animal and bird species, and the ecosystem services they provide—Research report
Article / Biodiversity / East Africa / Environment / Geodata / ILRI / Kenya / Pastoralism / Policy / Rangelands / Science paper / SLS / Wildlife

Kenya risks losing 18 animal and bird species, and the ecosystem services they provide—Research report

A group of scientists led by Dr Joseph Ogutu say Kenya risks losing 18 animal and bird species due to negligence. They include warthogs, lesser kudu, Thomson’s gazelle, eland, oryx, topi, hartebeest, impala, Grévy’s zebra, waterbuck, wildebeest, giraffe, gerenuk, Grant’s gazelle, buffalo, elephant, ostrich and Burchell’s zebra. Continue reading

New paper reveals nexus between scientific assessment methods and social accountability
Article / Livestock Systems / Research / Science paper / SLS

New paper reveals nexus between scientific assessment methods and social accountability

A newly published study analysed socioecological assessment technologies to establish how scientific socio-ecological assessments promote science-policy-practice and how scientific choices can simplify complex sociological relationships with implications for science-policy-practice Continue reading

Animal Feeding / Crop-Livestock / Drylands / DRYLANDS-CRP / Extension / Feeds / Forages / ILRI / Legumes / LIVESTOCK-CRP / Research / SLS / Southern Africa / Zimbabwe

Guide to haymaking using tropical grasses and legumes

A new extension brief by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) explains the principles of haymaking using tropical grasses and legumes. Produced by ILRI researchers and partners in Zimbabwe, the brief gives practical steps on how smallholder farmers can make hay from grasses and legumes such as cowpeas, velvet bean (Mucuna pruriens) lablab (Lablab purpureus) including … Continue reading

The epidemiological search for Ebola’s hiding places
A4NH / Africa / AHH / Article / Emerging Diseases / Epidemiology / FSZ / ILRI / Pigs / Uganda / Wildlife / Zoonotic Diseases

The epidemiological search for Ebola’s hiding places

After the recent epidemic, Ebola disappeared. But this relief is only temporary: the virus is hiding somewhere—maybe in forest animals, maybe closer to home. Leigh Cowart joins the hunt. This article was first published by Wellcome on Mosaic and is reproduced here under a Creative Commons licence. Continue reading